College of Dentistry
Dean: Patrick M. Lloyd
Fun Fact: Among the College’s many illustrious alumni is Heisman winner Leslie “Les” Horvath (DDS ‘45).
Brief History: Though the College of Dentistry has been a part of OSU since 1914, it was initially started in 1890 as part of the Ohio Medical University, a private medical school located in Columbus. Ohio Medical University was merged with Starling Medical College in 1907 to become Starling-Ohio Medical College. In 1914, Starling-Ohio was transferred to the ownership of Ohio State and became the College of Medicine and College of Dentistry.

College of Dentistry

Dean: Patrick M. Lloyd

Fun Fact: Among the College’s many illustrious alumni is Heisman winner Leslie “Les” Horvath (DDS ‘45).

Brief History: Though the College of Dentistry has been a part of OSU since 1914, it was initially started in 1890 as part of the Ohio Medical University, a private medical school located in Columbus. Ohio Medical University was merged with Starling Medical College in 1907 to become Starling-Ohio Medical College. In 1914, Starling-Ohio was transferred to the ownership of Ohio State and became the College of Medicine and College of Dentistry.

Fisher College of Business
Dean: Christine A. Poon
Fun Fact: Famous alumni include Les Wexner (Chairman and CEO of L Brands), Alex Schoenbaum (founder of Shoney’s restaurants), and Paul F. Iams (founder of the Iams pet food company).
Brief History: What is now known as the Max. M. Fisher College of Business first began in 1915 as the College of Commerce and Journalism. After many name changes-to the College of Commerce and Administration in 1927, College of Administrative Science in 1967, and College of Business in 1986- it was given its current name in 1993 to honor alumnus Max Fisher.

Fisher College of Business

Dean: Christine A. Poon

Fun Fact: Famous alumni include Les Wexner (Chairman and CEO of L Brands), Alex Schoenbaum (founder of Shoney’s restaurants), and Paul F. Iams (founder of the Iams pet food company).

Brief History: What is now known as the Max. M. Fisher College of Business first began in 1915 as the College of Commerce and Journalism. After many name changes-to the College of Commerce and Administration in 1927, College of Administrative Science in 1967, and College of Business in 1986- it was given its current name in 1993 to honor alumnus Max Fisher.

College of Arts and Sciences
Dean: David C. Manderscheid
Fun Fact: It is the largest college on campus, with more than 34% of undergraduates enrolled in 2013.
Brief History: Unlike many of the other colleges, Arts and Sciences has had a long and complicated history that makes it difficult to pin down an exact date of establishment. The first time the name was used was in 1929. Before that it was known as the College of Arts, College of Arts, Philosophy and Science, and the College of Liberal Arts.
In the late 1960s the College was reorganized as the Colleges of Arts and Sciences and was made up of six separate colleges that functioned largely separately but shared some administrative oversight. These six colleges were the College of the Arts, College of Biological Sciences, College of Humanities, College of Mathematics and Physical Sciences, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and University College. University College became part of the Office of Undergraduate Student Academic Services in 2001, leaving Arts and Sciences with only five colleges.
In 2010 these five colleges were merged into the single College of Arts and Sciences that exists today. 

College of Arts and Sciences

Dean: David C. Manderscheid

Fun Fact: It is the largest college on campus, with more than 34% of undergraduates enrolled in 2013.

Brief History: Unlike many of the other colleges, Arts and Sciences has had a long and complicated history that makes it difficult to pin down an exact date of establishment. The first time the name was used was in 1929. Before that it was known as the College of Arts, College of Arts, Philosophy and Science, and the College of Liberal Arts.

In the late 1960s the College was reorganized as the Colleges of Arts and Sciences and was made up of six separate colleges that functioned largely separately but shared some administrative oversight. These six colleges were the College of the Arts, College of Biological Sciences, College of Humanities, College of Mathematics and Physical Sciences, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and University College. University College became part of the Office of Undergraduate Student Academic Services in 2001, leaving Arts and Sciences with only five colleges.

In 2010 these five colleges were merged into the single College of Arts and Sciences that exists today. 

Today Woody visits the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum (BICLM) for their Grand Opening Festival. The BICLM recently moved from their former home in the Fine Arts Library to newly renovated spaces in Sullivant Hall.

The BICLM was started in 1977 with the papers of Milton Caniff, an OSU alum, and since then the collections have grown to include cartoons and comics of many kinds. Their new space includes galleries for exhibits, so stop by and check them out the next time you’re on campus!

Today Woody visits his penultimate Special Collection, the Medical Heritage Center (MHC). Here you see him with one of their artifacts, a cabinet built to hold dental instruments.
The MHC serves as the special collection unit for the Health Sciences Library. The collection includes artifacts, manuscripts and historical medical texts that document the history of the study of medicine at OSU. With the 100th anniversary of a number of health science colleges coming up next year, they’re planning a lot of interesting projects highlighting their materials. Stay tuned!

Today Woody visits his penultimate Special Collection, the Medical Heritage Center (MHC). Here you see him with one of their artifacts, a cabinet built to hold dental instruments.

The MHC serves as the special collection unit for the Health Sciences Library. The collection includes artifacts, manuscripts and historical medical texts that document the history of the study of medicine at OSU. With the 100th anniversary of a number of health science colleges coming up next year, they’re planning a lot of interesting projects highlighting their materials. Stay tuned!


Woody embraces his inner supermodel when he stops by a photo shoot at OSU’s Historic Costume and Textiles (HCT) Collection. HCT’s collections are particularly strong in the areas of 20th century design, buttons, textile history, and ethnographic dress.
While not administratively a part of OSU Libraries, HCT does frequently collaborate with the other Special Collections on projects and regularly exhibits materials in Thompson Library and Campbell Hall.

Woody embraces his inner supermodel when he stops by a photo shoot at OSU’s Historic Costume and Textiles (HCT) Collection. HCT’s collections are particularly strong in the areas of 20th century design, buttons, textile history, and ethnographic dress.

While not administratively a part of OSU Libraries, HCT does frequently collaborate with the other Special Collections on projects and regularly exhibits materials in Thompson Library and Campbell Hall.

Woody poses in front of a photograph of the Hilandar Monastery on Mount Athos in Greece after which the Hilandar Research Library at Ohio State is named.
The Hilandar Research Library holds the world’s largest collection of medieval Slavic manuscripts on microfilm. The collection has also grown to include original manuscript collections and artifacts.

Woody poses in front of a photograph of the Hilandar Monastery on Mount Athos in Greece after which the Hilandar Research Library at Ohio State is named.

The Hilandar Research Library holds the world’s largest collection of medieval Slavic manuscripts on microfilm. The collection has also grown to include original manuscript collections and artifacts.

Today Woody takes a break from his Halloween revelries to wonder if he could use this printing press at the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library (RBM) to print up his playbooks.
The RBM collection contains many early print volumes as well as various manuscript collections, including the papers of OSU’s own James Thurber. If you’re on campus this semester, be sure to stop by the Thompson Library Gallery for their exhibit on The Irish Literary Renaissance.

Today Woody takes a break from his Halloween revelries to wonder if he could use this printing press at the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library (RBM) to print up his playbooks.

The RBM collection contains many early print volumes as well as various manuscript collections, including the papers of OSU’s own James Thurber. If you’re on campus this semester, be sure to stop by the Thompson Library Gallery for their exhibit on The Irish Literary Renaissance.

Today Woody stops by the William Charvat Collection of American Fiction to flip through some of the more colorful novels in the collection.
William Charvat, a professor of American literature at OSU, helped guide the development of the collection until his death in 1966, at which point the collection was named in his memory. It is one of the most comprehensive collections of American fiction in the world and, in addition to the published materials, is home to a number of important manuscript collections.

Today Woody stops by the William Charvat Collection of American Fiction to flip through some of the more colorful novels in the collection.

William Charvat, a professor of American literature at OSU, helped guide the development of the collection until his death in 1966, at which point the collection was named in his memory. It is one of the most comprehensive collections of American fiction in the world and, in addition to the published materials, is home to a number of important manuscript collections.

Today Woody takes to the stage with these 3-D set models created by Tony Straiges from the Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee Theatre Research Institute (TRI).
TRI has been at OSU since 1951 when it was founded as the Ohio State University Theatre Collection. The name was changed to honor Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, playwrights from Ohio, in 1986. The collection includes a wide variety of manuscripts, publications, and objects related to the performing arts.

Today Woody takes to the stage with these 3-D set models created by Tony Straiges from the Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee Theatre Research Institute (TRI).

TRI has been at OSU since 1951 when it was founded as the Ohio State University Theatre Collection. The name was changed to honor Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, playwrights from Ohio, in 1986. The collection includes a wide variety of manuscripts, publications, and objects related to the performing arts.

Today Woody stops by for a visit with Senator John Glenn’s archives at the Ohio Congressional Archives. Here you see him standing next to the flight jacket from Glenn’s second flight on the space shuttle Discovery in 1998 when he made history as the oldest man to go into space.
The Glenn Collection forms the backbone of the OCA which has grown to include the papers of William McCulloch, Deobrah Pryce, Ralph Regula and Milton Wolf.

Today Woody stops by for a visit with Senator John Glenn’s archives at the Ohio Congressional Archives. Here you see him standing next to the flight jacket from Glenn’s second flight on the space shuttle Discovery in 1998 when he made history as the oldest man to go into space.

The Glenn Collection forms the backbone of the OCA which has grown to include the papers of William McCulloch, Deobrah Pryce, Ralph Regula and Milton Wolf.

Today Woody is chilling with a poster from Admiral Byrd’s lecture tour. The poster is part of the Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program (BPRCAP), a collaboration between OSU Libraries and the Byrd Polar Research Center. OSU acquired Byrd’s papers in 1985 and the BPRCAP has since grown to include the papers of many other polar explorers and scientists.

Today Woody is chilling with a poster from Admiral Byrd’s lecture tour. The poster is part of the Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program (BPRCAP), a collaboration between OSU Libraries and the Byrd Polar Research Center. OSU acquired Byrd’s papers in 1985 and the BPRCAP has since grown to include the papers of many other polar explorers and scientists.

In recognition of the grand re-opening of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum next month, Woody’s latest adventure will take you on a tour behind the scenes of many of OSU Library’s Special Collections.
Today Woody begins at his home away from home, the University Archives. The Archives houses thousands of cubic feet of records documenting the history of OSU, including about 70 cubic feet of Woody’s own papers and his couch.

In recognition of the grand re-opening of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum next month, Woody’s latest adventure will take you on a tour behind the scenes of many of OSU Library’s Special Collections.

Today Woody begins at his home away from home, the University Archives. The Archives houses thousands of cubic feet of records documenting the history of OSU, including about 70 cubic feet of Woody’s own papers and his couch.

Today Woody wearily cruises down Woody Hayes Drive on his way back home at the end of a long tour of Columbus. In 1982, a portion of Woodruff Ave. that runs past the stadium was renamed to honor the coach’s contributions to the OSU campus.
Woody’s going to take the rest of the semester off, but watch out for some new adventures this summer!

Today Woody wearily cruises down Woody Hayes Drive on his way back home at the end of a long tour of Columbus. In 1982, a portion of Woodruff Ave. that runs past the stadium was renamed to honor the coach’s contributions to the OSU campus.

Woody’s going to take the rest of the semester off, but watch out for some new adventures this summer!

Today Woody visits the first statue of himself on University property, unveiled earlier this month. It stands outside the Woody Hayes Athletic Center and Woody thinks it’s a pretty good likeness!

Today Woody visits the first statue of himself on University property, unveiled earlier this month. It stands outside the Woody Hayes Athletic Center and Woody thinks it’s a pretty good likeness!